On Writing with a “Personal Style”

If you’ve ever read a McCarthy novel, you already know what I’m getting at. People love him or hate him (I come from the first school), and the latter often feels the way they do because he seems to hold something against the conventional use of punctuation. And, if you’re reading out loud, breathing. If … Continue reading On Writing with a “Personal Style”

Ways I Hold Myself Back as a Writer

The average writer is his or her own worst enemy when it comes to motivation, discipline, and skill. We all have/had an age by which we wanted to be published, and for those of us who haven’t yet reached that goal, it can feel like we failed our own expectations. As a kid I was … Continue reading Ways I Hold Myself Back as a Writer

Who is Your Protagonist?

As I hem and haw about the possibility of participating in NaNoWrimo this year, I’ve been thinking a lot about the protagonist of my in progress novel. He’s been the subject of a lot of controversy in the ream of critiques. He went from a supporting nobody to a guy with a full backstory, a … Continue reading Who is Your Protagonist?

Are You Doing NaNoWriMo?

Every year I see people participating in National Novel Writing Month, and every year I regard these people with wary admiration. They must be crazy, I think, to imagine they can crank out a full-length novel in a month. They must be well-disciplined, I also think. I wish I had that sort of determination. A … Continue reading Are You Doing NaNoWriMo?

Collaborative Storytelling and Your Writing

I was ten years old in the year 1999. I had finally “mastered” the art of typing, and had just enough experience using computers to conduct my own Internet searches. Neopets was brand new and all the rage, so like many preteens in that era I spent a lot of time with the virtual pets … Continue reading Collaborative Storytelling and Your Writing

Show and Tell in Writing

CEOLSIGE

If you submit your creative writing for critiquing, you’ll quickly become familiar with the phrase, “Show, don’t tell.”

According to the modern critiquer, “telling” is an unspeakably evil act in the realm of creative writing. You must never tell. Always show.

I have mixed feelings about this. On one hand, showing is more interesting for the reader. On the other, well… Imagine if you had, back in kindergarten, had “show” instead of “show and tell.” Imagine each child holding up a random ass item, allowing the other children to stare at it for a length of time, then wordlessly returning to their seat.

There is room in the world for show and tell, and both are important. I don’t see a need to show everything, but this is where my stance on the matter shifts.

Showing is so much better.

Showing happens in verbs. With action.

Back to the…

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Writing the Opposite Sex

CEOLSIGE

I want to make clear my opinion before I get into the meat of this post: I almost always write about the opposite sex. (So, men.) I don’t know why. I’d just rather.

So obviously, I think you should write about who-the-fuck-ever you want.

You’ll run into plenty of people who think otherwise. In my millions and millions of play by post roleplays over the years, I ran into plenty of people who got outright pissed when they found out I don’t have a penis. Mind you, this was us playing as fictional, made up characters, not me catfishing people as a dude.

I’ve had people tell me that, as a woman, I can’t write convincingly from a male point of view. (Before seeing my writing.)

If someone comes at you with that bullshit, headbutt them in the face ignore their ass. You can and must write who and what…

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3 Must Have Writing Tools

CEOLSIGE

Using great tools may not automatically make you a great writer, but it’s also hard to write at your best when you’re dissatisfied with your word processor. Maybe the fonts are rendered poorly, or the interface is cluttered with too many distracting options. These are a few of my favorite writing tools for word processing and editing.

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A Quick Guide to Avoid Head Hopping

CEOLSIGE

Head Hopping: What not to do.

“It’s spelt grey,” said Bertha, slamming her fist down on the restaurant table. “G-R-E-Y.” How was Barnaby dense enough to believe otherwise?

Barnaby looked into Bertha’s beady, unintelligent eyes and seethed. “No, it’s spelled gray. G-R-A-Y.” He felt ready to up and leave her sitting there at the diner.

Close-Third Person: What you can do.

“It’s spelt grey,” said Bertha, slamming her fist down on the table. “G-R-E-Y.” Barnaby was such an uncultured idiot. Why was she even hanging out with him?

Omniscient: What you can also do.

“It’s spelt grey,” said Bertha. “G-R-E-Y.”

She couldn’t wrap her head around how stupid Barnaby was, and he felt the same.

Standing from the table, Barnaby slammed the cash for his meal onto the table. “That’s it; I can’t stand your pretentious spelling habits another moment. I’m going to the theater alone.” He felt…

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